Monthly Archives: December 2011

You say Tomato, I say WTF?

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Tomato Rhapsody by Adam Schell

After having read this, I am left with nothing but a profound sense of loss. As if millions(alright, maybe dozens) of my brain cells cried out at once, and were suddenly silenced.

It’s just so… bad.

Let me see if I can explain why. Read the rest of this entry

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Quickie: The Ship Who Searched by Anne McCaffrey & Mercedes Lackey

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The Ship Who Searched is one of my favorite books in the Brain & Brawn (Brainship) series. Most of the books in this series are stand alones, so it is possible to read them out of order.

Tia is a 7 year old genius when she is struck by a mysterious virus that completely killed her body’s nervous system. She became paralyzed from the neck down, needing 100% life support. She was going to end up spending the rest of her life in a sterile hospital room somewhere. Because of her maturity and genius she is accepted into the brainship program. This program will place her physical body inside a titanium shell, connect her brain to electronic synapses, and teach her how to fly. Tia is to become a brainship – a person whose physical body is an interstellar spaceship. She will also get a brawn – Alex – a person trained to work with her as her physical presence as well as constant companion.

Tia & Alex have numerous adventures in this book – but main focus for both Tia & Alex is locating the virus that almost destroyed her entire life.

The Ship Who Searched is a great book! The characters are well formed and the adventures are interesting. The pace is quick and engrossing. There’s not too much more to say without spoiling the plot(s).

Review: The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien

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The Things They CarriedThe Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien
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Incredible. Parts of “How to Tell a True War Story” come to mind regularly. I love Tim O’Brien‘s writing. Those were the three things I had to say about The Things They Carried when I initially “reviewed” this book. I hold to all of those. This is my third reading and I found the book even better than it was eleven years ago. “How to Tell a True War Story” has probably influenced my views on writing and literature more than anything else I have ever read. There is a beautiful clarity and painful honesty that permeates this book. I can’t say enough good things about it.

View all my reviews

Review: The Desert Spear by Peter V. Brett

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In the past I’ve been called a “book slut”, and I don’t argue this title. I read a lot of books, and I’m not hard to please. But I’ve been thinking lately.. Maybe the better term for me might be “book nympho”. You see, I enjoy reading, all reading, good or bad. Where as a “book slut” might read a lot of books, any books really, they might not necessarily enjoy reading them. The whole time they are reading they are looking for something in particular. They read to critique, to pick a book apart, always looking for that next great book to fill the bookless empty part of their soul, but never quite finding a perfect fit. A “book nympho” on the other hand.. Enjoys reading. Any reading. Some books are much better in bed to read than others, but they still enjoy the act of reading the ones that aren’t as good, they overlook flaws and things that might annoy others, because they get caught up in the act of reading and just want more more moremoremoremoremore.

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Review: The Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother by Amy Chua

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“Chinese parents assume strength, not fragility.” – Amy Chua, The Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother

I’m having a hard time both reviewing and rating this book. I think one of the reasons is related to some anger at Amy Chua – she often comes across as unnecessarily harsh and cruel when speaking to her daughters. In fact, she sometimes comes across as crazy.

One of the things I can’t argue with are her results.
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Review: The Unit by Ninni Holmqvist

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The UnitThe Unit by Ninni Holmqvist
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The Unit is the saddest piece of dystopian fiction I have ever read. Normally the genre leaves me angry or frightened or feeling the need for a good shower, but this made me feel heartbroken. The Unit is a place where women who have reached the age of 50 and men who have reached the age of 60 without having children are sent to live in order to participate in “humane” experiments and act as organ donors for the so-called needed. These people are known as dispensable.

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Review: Monster Hunter Vendetta (MHI 2) by Larry Correia

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”Them monsters ain’t gonna to kill themselves! You a Monster Hunter, or not?”
-Monster Hunter Vendetta

WOW! Larry Correia has done it again! Monster Hunter International (MHI) was a great book – and Monster Hunter Vendetta (MHV) is pretty darn great, too.

Monster Hunter Vendetta (MHV) starts off with a bang and I spent the rest of the time trying to catch my breath. The action hits brutally hard and it’s almost non-stop from beginning to end. This series would make a GREAT action movie!

MHV starts off when MHI left off. The nuclear bomb that the federal government sent to kill off the last group of world killers accidentally entered a rift between this world and a dark universe ruled by a dread lord. The bomb exploded and hurt the dread lord in some minor way and now it wants revenge. The Church of the Temporary Mortal Condition – demon worshipers – plot to capture Owen Z. Pitt and offer him to the dread lord in order to gain power. The hunters become the hunted…it’s a good thing that Monster Hunters always come locked and loaded.
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